Retour Accueil
 
    Télécharger le catalogue indesens 2012 en PDF  
   
 
> Voir mon panier
 
Recherche tous genres / search :
"Le label Indésens créé par Benoit d'Hau peut vraiment trouver sa place dans un univers pourtant saturé de productions en tout genre.
Par un réel désir de trouver une identité à chaque album, de mieux laisser s'épanouir les spécificités de cette école instrumentale française, et de s'ouvrir à des compositeurs de notre temps qui se situent dans le sillage de cette dernière, il encourage la création et la redécouverte d'oeuvres parfois rares."
Thierry Escaich Compositeur, Organiste, Professeur au CNSMDP
 
 
Accueil 
 
Distribution 
 
Le label 
 
Organisation 
 
Artistes 
 
Catalogue INDÉSENS 
 
Catalogue Calliope 
 
Contact 
 
 
   
   Voir mon panier
 
  Grands concertos classiques pour trompette
Haydn - Hummel - Mozart - Bach - Telemann
Eric AUBIER, François LELEUX, Benoit FROMANGER, Alain MOGLIA
INDE018
Vincent Barthe, direction - Orchestre National de Chambre de Toulouse, Orchestre de Bretagne


          ACHETER LE CD
    Prix : 17 €  
  Track liste
  Livret français
  Critiques presse
 
 




REVIEWS 5 DIAPASON Nov 2009 - Jean CABOURG
Télécharger le fichier PDF

The bible gives evidence : the trumpet is the most ancient instrument. At first, its function was descriptive – used especially by watchmen- long before the baroque era during which one discovered its musical virtues. Improvements of instruments lead major composers during the Age of Reason to the trumpet, phenomenon that amplified at the end of the XIXth century , placing this wind instrument among the leading instruments. According to Praetorius, composer and theorist from the beginning of the baroque era, “the trumpet is a magnificent instrument when a virtuoso masters it with art”. Among the great players who contributed to its respectability, Gottfried Reiche was JS Bach’s trumpet player in Leipzig. Around 1800, Anton Weidinger inventor of the chromatic trumpet gave rise to the Haydn and Hummel concerti. At the turning point of the XIXth and XXth centuries, a tribute must be paid to Jean-Baptiste Arban. The masters of the concerto trumpet of the second part of the XXth century are Adolph Scherbaum and especially Maurice André, who hurled the instrument to the front of the international scene. Since the early 90ties, history moves on with two exceptional trumpet players : Wynton Marsalis, who after having explored the classical repertory, now participates in USA’s jazz renaissance and development among the American youth ; and Eric Aubier in Europe, who has a major contribution in the expanding of classical and modern trumpet, due to his dedication towards today’s composers and teaching across the world.

Art of the classical trumpet, from the baroque age to the romantic age.

During the XVIth, XVIIth and XVIIIth centuries, art of the trumpet is linked to Central Europe and Italian bishops’ and princes’ court music. The main founders of trumpets literature at the time were Torelli in Bologna, Vivaldi in Venise, Haydn (who served the prince of Esterhazy), Telemann in Hamburg, Stamitz in Manheim, Richter, Gross and Riepel in Fulda, without forgetting Moler in Karlsruhe, Hertel, Endler in Darmstadt, Vejvanovsky (Olmüz in Moravia followed by Kromeriz)… and in France : Mouret and Delalande in Versailles with Table Music for Louis XIV.

Written mid XVIIIth century, Georg Philipp Telemann’s (1681-1767) concerto for trumpet in D major, with strings and bass (played in this album by the bassoon), adopts the “concerto like a suite” quadripartite structure, closer to Corelli than Vivaldi. His overall aesthetics is the turning point between the baroque age and the classical age. The majestic (and proving ) introduction adagio develops a Haendelian moving theme. The movements that follow are typical of the polyphonic Germanic tradition. It is still written for the natural trumpet without pistons in the clarino register, the instruments highest pitch.

Leopold Mozart (1719-1787), quite famous at the time, “is only known for having been his father’s son” wrote Albert Einstein. This is quite unfair when one takes a look at the quality of some of his scores, like this concerto for trumpet with two movements, extract of the Serenade in D major for trumpet, horn, trombone and strings, of which the composing environment is still unknown. One supposes that Mozart wrote it for the trumpet player from Salzburg who belonged to the Schachtner court. Set in the high pitch of the the clarino , the cantabile andante is particularly proving for the player. The allegro moderato theme is a polka which requires elegance and finesse, magnificently performed by Eric Aubier.

Gottfried Reiche (1667-1734), Bach’s trumpeter in Leipzig, played the second Brandebourgeois concerto, composed between 1719 and 1721 ordered by Christian Ludwig, Brandenburg’s margrave. This concerto has an Italian style structure : three movements “lively-slow-lively” and is also inspired by the French style because it stages four soloist instruments : trumpet, oboe, flute and violin. The trumpet has the leading part.

Anton Weidinger, the Vienna Court Opera’s trumpet player, made the repertory progress as well as the instrument. He finalized a trumpet with keys in E flat, end of the XVIIIth century, which is the advent of chromatic trumpet.
Weidinger improved it in 1801 by adding extra keys, but the instrument was still perfectible and was modernized once again, by adding pistons from 1813, thanks to a certain Bluehmel. The trumpet with keys lasted only twenty or thirty years, but due to Weidingers strong personality, two concerti are everlasting in the classical repertory : the Haydn and Hummels concerti.

The Concerto in E flat major Hob. VIIth : 1 by Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), was composed in 1796 and first performed in Vienna in 1800. This late piece by Haydn, is his last orchestral composition, and requires a fairly large number of players, such as the London symphonies. Nearly fifteen minutes long, which must have been already very challenging for Weidinger at the time, this concerto with three movements begins with a long orchestral introduction which announces the trumpet playing a chromatic scale in E flat major. Haydn then alternates throughout the piece, chromatic parts that became possible thanks to the new instrument, with trills and high note sequences, typical of the natural trumpet. The slow movement is original because it modulates tones, demonstrating that the trumpet has become as flexible as the flute or the voice.

The same principles apply to Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837) Concerto in E major, composed in December 1803 and first played in Vienna in 1804 by Anton Weidinger. Three months later, Hummel was nominated successor to his master Haydn in the Einsenstadt chapel, where he will stay until 1811. From then on, he privileges his personal career as Vienna composer, rather than his Court duties. Due to his youth, inspiration and expressivity, Hummels music is a bridge that leads Mozart (his first professor) to Beethoven and Chopin. The second and last movements illustrate this. The central deep andante, beautifully performed thanks to Eric Aubiers’ lyricism, announces the romantic age. This movement can be compared to an opera aria in which the soloists’ voice is replaced by the trumpet, singing above the discreet harmonic and rhythmic sound of the orchestra. One can find similarities with the piano concerto KV 467 in C major. The lively Rondo is a brilliant and prancing prowess demonstration, where the technique, skill and finesse of Eric Aubiers’ playing, contrast with the retained depth of the slow movement. The original version recorded in this album has been performed with a C trumpet and in the original E major tone, more challenging and difficult to balance with the modern instruments, than the transcription in E flat of most existing recordings of this concerto. After 150 years of silence, it is Edward Tarr who exhumed this score in 1971, kept in London. The composers’ notes written with different inks are the sign that, as for Beethoven and his concerto for violin, Hummel composed a first version of the concerto, then wrote the final soloist part after the first composition.

Translation : Virginia Olivier 2009.


Comme en témoigne la Bible, la trompette est l’instrument le plus ancien. Dans les temps reculés sa fonction était signalétique – utilisée par les veilleurs notamment - bien avant la période baroque où on lui découvrit des vertus musicales. Les améliorations de la facture instrumentale ont conduit les grands compositeurs du siècle des Lumières à s’y intéresser, phénomène qui s’est renforcé dès la fin du 19ème siècle, pour ériger aujourd’hui la trompette en instrument majeur. Selon le compositeur et théoricien Praetorius du début de l’ère baroque « La trompette est un instrument magnifique lorqu’un virtuose sait la maîtriser avec art ». Parmi les serviteurs exceptionnels qui lui donnèrent ses lettres de noblesse, Gottfried Reiche fut le trompettiste de JS Bach à Leipzig, Anton Weidinger vers 1800, inventeur de la trompette chromatique suscita les concerti de Haydn et Hummel. Au tournant des 19ème et 20ème siècles on retiendra le cornettiste Jean-Baptiste Arban. Les pères de la trompette concertante de la seconde partie du 20ème siècle sont Adolph Scherbaum et surtout Maurice André, qui projetèrent l’instrument au devant de la scène internationale. Depuis les années 90 l’histoire continue avec deux trompettistes exceptionnels : Wynton Marsalis, après avoir exploré le répertoire classique participe à la renaissance du jazz aux USA et le cultive auprès de la jeunesse américaine et Eric Aubier en Europe, contribue largement au développement de la trompette classique et moderne, par son engagement auprès des compositeurs actuels et son implication dans l’enseignement à travers le monde.

L’art de la trompette « classique », du baroque au romantisme

L’art de la trompette aux 16ème, 17ème et 18ème siècles est directement lié aux musiques de cours des évêques et princes d’Europe centrale, et d’Italie. Les principaux fondateurs de la littérature pour trompette de cette époque furent Torelli à Bologne, Vivaldi à Venise, Haydn (au service du prince d’Esterhazy), Telemann à Hambourg, Stamitz (Manheim), Richter, Gross et Riepel à Fulda, sans oublier Molter (Karlsruhe), Hertel, Endler (Darmstadt), Vejvanovsky (Olmüz en Moravie puis Kromeriz)… et les français Mouret et Delalande à Versailles avec notamment des Musiques de tables pour le Roi soleil.

Ecrit au milieu du 18ème siècle, le concerto pour trompette en ré majeur de Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) pour trompette, cordes et basse continue (ici jouée par un basson) adopte la construction quadripartite du « concerto en forme de suite » plus proche de Corelli que de Vivaldi. Son esthétique générale marque la charnière entre l’ère baroque et la période classique. Le majestueux (et éprouvant) adagio introductif développe un thème Haendelien de caractère pathétique. Les mouvements suivants s’inscrivent dans la tradition polyphonique germanique. Il est encore écrit pour la trompette naturelle dépourvue de piston, dans le registre de clarino, le plus aigu de l’instrument.

Leopold Mozart (1719-1787), assez célèbre à son époque, « ne vit au souvenir de la postérité que pour avoir été le père de son fils » écrivit Albert Einstein. C’est assez injuste au regard de la qualité de certaines partitions, comme ce concerto pour trompette en deux mouvements, extrait de la Sérénade en Ré majeur pour trompette, cor, trombone et cordes, dont les circonstances de la composition restent encore inconnues. On suppose que Mozart l’écrivit pour le trompettiste salzbourgeois de la cour de Schachtner. Situé dans le registre aigu de clarino, l’andante cantabile est particulièrement éprouvant pour le soliste. L’allegro moderato est un thème de polka qui requiert une grande élégance et finesse de jeu, magnifiquement servi par Eric Aubier.

C’est Gottfried Reiche (1667-1734), trompettiste de Bach à Leipzig, fut l’interprète du second concerto Brandebourgeois, composé entre 1719 et 1721 pour honorer la commande de Christian Ludwig, le margrave de Brandenburg. Ce concerto est de style italien dans la forme : trois mouvements « vif-lent-vif », et également inspiré du style français dans la mesure où il met en scène quatre instruments solistes : trompette, hautbois, flûte et violon. La trompette y occupe la place prépondérante.

C'est Anton Weidinger, trompettiste de l'Opéra de la Cour de Vienne, qui fit évoluer le répertoire en même temps que la facture instrumentale. Il mit au point une trompette à clefs en Mi bémol à la fin du 18ème siècle, qui marque l’avènement du chromatisme à la trompette. Weidinger l'améliora en 1801 en la dotant de clés supplémentaires, mais l’instrument restait perfectible et sera rapidement modernisé à nouveau, par l’apport des pistons dès 1813, par un certain Bluehmel. La trompette à clefs n’aura traversé l’histoire des instruments à vent que pendant deux ou trois décennies mais, grâce à la personnalité de Weidinger, aura laissé deux pans incontestables du répertoire classique, les concertos de Haydn et Hummel.

Le Concerto en Mi bémol majeur Hob. VIIe : 1 de Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) date de 1796 et fut créé à Vienne en 1800. Cette œuvre relativement tardive de Haydn est sa dernière composition purement orchestrale, et fait appel à une formation assez large, celle des symphonies londoniennes. D’une durée légèrement inférieure à quinze minutes, ce qui devait être déjà très éprouvant pour Weidinger à l’époque, ce concerto en trois mouvement débute par une longue introduction orchestrale annonçant l’entrée de la trompette exécutant une gamme chromatique en mi bémol majeur. Haydn alterne ensuite, tout au long de l’œuvre, des passages chromatiques rendus possible par le nouvel instrument, et des séquences de trilles et de notes aiguës typiques de la trompette naturelle. Le mouvement lent présente l’originalité de moduler les tonalités, démontrant que la trompette est devenue aussi souple que la flûte ou la voix.

Les mêmes principes gouvernent le Concerto en Mi majeur de Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837), composé en décembre 1803 et créé le 1er janvier 1804 à Vienne par Anton Weidinger. Trois mois après la création du concerto pour trompette, Hummel fut nommé comme successeur de son maître Haydn à la chapelle d’Eisenstadt, poste dont il sera remercié en 1811 privilégiant sa carrière personnelle de compositeur à Vienne, plutôt que sa charge à la Cour. Par sa fraîcheur, son inspiration et son expressivité, la musique de Hummel constitue un pont entre Mozart (son premier professeur) et les romantiques Beethoven ou Chopin. Les seconds et derniers mouvements en sont l’illustration. Le profond andante central, magistralement transcendé par le lyrisme d’Eric Aubier, annonce le romantisme. Ce mouvement est comparable à un aria d’opéra où la voix soliste est confiée à la trompette, chantant au dessus d’un discret soutien harmonique et rythmique de l’orchestre. On y retrouve des similitudes avec le concerto pour piano KV 467 en Ut majeur. Le vif Rondo enchaîné est une brillante et caracolante démonstration de voltige où la technique, la brillance et la finesse du jeu d’Eric Aubier viennent contraster avec la profondeur retenue du mouvement lent. La version enregistrée dans cet album a été réalisée sur une trompette un Ut, et dans la tonalité originale de Mi majeur, plus éprouvante et difficile d’équilibre avec les instruments modernes, que la transcription en Mi bémol de la plupart des enregistrements existants de ce concerto. Après 150 ans de sommeil c’est Edward Tarr qui exhuma en 1971 cette partition conservée à Londres. Les annotations du compositeur de plusieurs encres différentes démontrent que, comme Beethoven avec son concerto pour violon, Hummel avait jeté une première version du concerto, puis rédigé la partie soliste définitive après la première exécution.

Benoit d’Hau © 2009

FANFARE MAGAZINE REVIEWS / USA 2010
This is the third disc in Indésens’s Eric Aubier edition. The selections presented here are taken from two discs: the Telemann and Hummel from a Mandala recording, The Masters of the Trumpet , issued around 1997, and the other three works from a 1988 Sony disc titled The Most Beautiful Concertos . In a review of the first disc in the series ( Fanfare 31:6), Phillip Scott, quoting Paul Snook from an earlier review (12:3), referred to Aubier’s style as “flamboyant virtuosity” and described his playing as “brash, burnished, theatrical, and sensual.” All of these adjectives can be applied to Aubier’s brilliant playing on this disc as well.

Aubier’s performances of these five much-recorded works is the antithesis of the routine, correct, but dull performances one might hear from a musician more interested in, for example, correct period practice than in an exciting performance. The playing is exciting and gives new life to works that have, perhaps, become over-familiar with repeated hearing. The sound of the Orchestre de Bretagne, which accompanies all but the Bach, playing modern instruments with little or no concession to current period practice, was jarring at first, so accustomed have we become to hearing period-instrument groups in repertoire from this period. But the ear soon adjusts to what was once the standard, and what is still an equally valid, orchestral sound. Vincent Barthe chooses reasonable tempos, and the Orchestre de Bretagne plays well, as does the Toulouse National Chamber Orchestra in the Brandenburg Concerto No. 2. This disc will probably not be pleasing to those who find it difficult to accept modern instruments in music of this period, but the rest of us can simply sit back and enjoy.
The Hummel concerto is performed in its original key, E. Hummel wrote it in 1803 for performance by Anton Weidinger on a keyed trumpet. (Haydn’s concerto was also written to be performed by Weidinger.) As valved trumpets replaced the keyed instrument, Hummel’s and Haydn’s concertos remained unperformed until modern times. The notes inaccurately give Edward Tarr credit for rediscovering the original. It was Merrill Debsky, a Yale University student, who found the original, and the first recording of it was made in 1964. Armando Ghitalla gave the first modern performance of the concerto in E and made the first recording. He also produced the first modern edition, but the publisher had the work transposed to Eflat to make it more playable on modern instruments. Tarr was, however, responsible for the first edition in the original key.
Fanfare readers probably have most, if not all, of these works on their shelves already. Wynton Marsalis on Sony (originally on CBS) performs the Hummel (in E♭), Haydn, and Mozart works with equal brilliance. Anyone looking for these works, or anyone who appreciates brilliant trumpet playing, will find this disc a worthwhile purchase. Ron Salemi



  Comme en témoigne la Bible, la trompette est l’instrument le plus ancien. Dans les temps reculés sa fonction était signalétique – utilisée par les veilleurs notamment - bien avant la période baroque où on lui découvrit des vertus musicales. Les améliorations de la facture instrumentale ont conduit les grands compositeurs du siècle des Lumières à s’y intéresser, phénomène qui s’est renforcé dès la fin du 19ème siècle, pour ériger aujourd’hui la trompette en instrument majeur. Selon le compositeur et théoricien Praetorius du début de l’ère baroque « La trompette est un instrument magnifique lorqu’un virtuose sait la maîtriser avec art ». Parmi les serviteurs exceptionnels qui lui donnèrent ses lettres de noblesse, Gottfried Reiche fut le trompettiste de JS Bach à Leipzig, Anton Weidinger vers 1800, inventeur de la trompette chromatique suscita les concerti de Haydn et Hummel. Au tournant des 19ème et 20ème siècles on retiendra le cornettiste Jean-Baptiste Arban. Les pères de la trompette concertante de la seconde partie du 20ème siècle sont Adolph Scherbaum et surtout Maurice André, qui projetèrent l’instrument au devant de la scène internationale. Depuis les années 90 l’histoire continue avec deux trompettistes exceptionnels : Wynton Marsalis, après avoir exploré le répertoire classique participe à la renaissance du jazz aux USA et le cultive auprès de la jeunesse américaine et Eric Aubier en Europe, contribue largement au développement de la trompette classique et moderne, par son engagement auprès des compositeurs actuels et son implication dans l’enseignement à travers le monde.

L’art de la trompette « classique », du baroque au romantisme

L’art de la trompette aux 16ème, 17ème et 18ème siècles est directement lié aux musiques de cours des évêques et princes d’Europe centrale, et d’Italie. Les principaux fondateurs de la littérature pour trompette de cette époque furent Torelli à Bologne, Vivaldi à Venise, Haydn (au service du prince d’Esterhazy), Telemann à Hambourg, Stamitz (Manheim), Richter, Gross et Riepel à Fulda, sans oublier Molter (Karlsruhe), Hertel, Endler (Darmstadt), Vejvanovsky (Olmüz en Moravie puis Kromeriz)… et les français Mouret et Delalande à Versailles avec notamment des Musiques de tables pour le Roi soleil.

Ecrit au milieu du 18ème siècle, le concerto pour trompette en ré majeur de Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) pour trompette, cordes et basse continue (ici jouée par un basson) adopte la construction quadripartite du « concerto en forme de suite » plus proche de Corelli que de Vivaldi. Son esthétique générale marque la charnière entre l’ère baroque et la période classique. Le majestueux (et éprouvant) adagio introductif développe un thème Haendelien de caractère pathétique. Les mouvements suivants s’inscrivent dans la tradition polyphonique germanique. Il est encore écrit pour la trompette naturelle dépourvue de piston, dans le registre de clarino, le plus aigu de l’instrument.

Leopold Mozart (1719-1787), assez célèbre à son époque, « ne vit au souvenir de la postérité que pour avoir été le père de son fils » écrivit Albert Einstein. C’est assez injuste au regard de la qualité de certaines partitions, comme ce concerto pour trompette en deux mouvements, extrait de la Sérénade en Ré majeur pour trompette, cor, trombone et cordes, dont les circonstances de la composition restent encore inconnues. On suppose que Mozart l’écrivit pour le trompettiste salzbourgeois de la cour de Schachtner. Situé dans le registre aigu de clarino, l’andante cantabile est particulièrement éprouvant pour le soliste. L’allegro moderato est un thème de polka qui requiert une grande élégance et finesse de jeu, magnifiquement servi par Eric Aubier.

C’est Gottfried Reiche (1667-1734), trompettiste de Bach à Leipzig, fut l’interprète du second concerto Brandebourgeois, composé entre 1719 et 1721 pour honorer la commande de Christian Ludwig, le margrave de Brandenburg. Ce concerto est de style italien dans la forme : trois mouvements « vif-lent-vif », et également inspiré du style français dans la mesure où il met en scène quatre instruments solistes : trompette, hautbois, flûte et violon. La trompette y occupe la place prépondérante.

C'est Anton Weidinger, trompettiste de l'Opéra de la Cour de Vienne, qui fit évoluer le répertoire en même temps que la facture instrumentale. Il mit au point une trompette à clefs en Mi bémol à la fin du 18ème siècle, qui marque l’avènement du chromatisme à la trompette. Weidinger l'améliora en 1801 en la dotant de clés supplémentaires, mais l’instrument restait perfectible et sera rapidement modernisé à nouveau, par l’apport des pistons dès 1813, par un certain Bluehmel. La trompette à clefs n’aura traversé l’histoire des instruments à vent que pendant deux ou trois décennies mais, grâce à la personnalité de Weidinger, aura laissé deux pans incontestables du répertoire classique, les concertos de Haydn et Hummel.

Le Concerto en Mi bémol majeur Hob. VIIe : 1 de Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) date de 1796 et fut créé à Vienne en 1800. Cette œuvre relativement tardive de Haydn est sa dernière composition purement orchestrale, et fait appel à une formation assez large, celle des symphonies londoniennes. D’une durée légèrement inférieure à quinze minutes, ce qui devait être déjà très éprouvant pour Weidinger à l’époque, ce concerto en trois mouvement débute par une longue introduction orchestrale annonçant l’entrée de la trompette exécutant une gamme chromatique en mi bémol majeur. Haydn alterne ensuite, tout au long de l’œuvre, des passages chromatiques rendus possible par le nouvel instrument, et des séquences de trilles et de notes aiguës typiques de la trompette naturelle. Le mouvement lent présente l’originalité de moduler les tonalités, démontrant que la trompette est devenue aussi souple que la flûte ou la voix.

Les mêmes principes gouvernent le Concerto en Mi majeur de Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837), composé en décembre 1803 et créé le 1er janvier 1804 à Vienne par Anton Weidinger. Trois mois après la création du concerto pour trompette, Hummel fut nommé comme successeur de son maître Haydn à la chapelle d’Eisenstadt, poste dont il sera remercié en 1811 privilégiant sa carrière personnelle de compositeur à Vienne, plutôt que sa charge à la Cour. Par sa fraîcheur, son inspiration et son expressivité, la musique de Hummel constitue un pont entre Mozart (son premier professeur) et les romantiques Beethoven ou Chopin. Les seconds et derniers mouvements en sont l’illustration. Le profond andante central, magistralement transcendé par le lyrisme d’Eric Aubier, annonce le romantisme. Ce mouvement est comparable à un aria d’opéra où la voix soliste est confiée à la trompette, chantant au dessus d’un discret soutien harmonique et rythmique de l’orchestre. On y retrouve des similitudes avec le concerto pour piano KV 467 en Ut majeur. Le vif Rondo enchaîné est une brillante et caracolante démonstration de voltige où la technique, la brillance et la finesse du jeu d’Eric Aubier viennent contraster avec la profondeur retenue du mouvement lent. La version enregistrée dans cet album a été réalisée sur une trompette un Ut, et dans la tonalité originale de Mi majeur, plus éprouvante et difficile d’équilibre avec les instruments modernes, que la transcription en Mi bémol de la plupart des enregistrements existants de ce concerto. Après 150 ans de sommeil c’est Edward Tarr qui exhuma en 1971 cette partition conservée à Londres. Les annotations du compositeur de plusieurs encres différentes démontrent que, comme Beethoven avec son concerto pour violon, Hummel avait jeté une première version du concerto, puis rédigé la partie soliste définitive après la première exécution.

Benoit d’Hau © 2009
 
 
   
 
   
     
   
 
 
Copyright Aditel